howstuffworks

mathmajik:

Fractal Geometry is based on the idea of scale invariance which means that a figure is the same, or is invariant, no matter on what scale it is observed. In other words, the figure is constructed by repeating the same pattern at smaller and smaller scales. The fern is certainly one of the best examples for understanding this idea: a small part of the figure when enlarged reproduces the original figure (or if you will, the part contains the whole). An object which possesses this property is called a fractal. From a mathematical point of view, the repetition of patterns at smaller and smaller scales can be continued to infinity. In the real word, nevertheless, the repetition stops after a certain number of jumps.

A fractal construction is extremely interesting for reasons of effectiveness. For example, if one wants to insert the largest sheet possible in the smallest possible volume, by folding it up in such a way that its faces never touch, one must give it a fractal shape. In addition, the instructions for such a folding are very simple (and can be written in very few words) since it suffices to state that the same folding pattern is repeated many times in succession. This is surely why one finds many fractal objects in nature: the instructions for their growth can be encoded in very little space in DNA.

This auto-repetition of the same structure can also be applied to phenomena which vary in time. For example, the fluctuations of the stock market possess a statistical fractal structure, that is to say, the fluctuations over a year are similar on the average to those over a month, or to those over a day, or even to those over an hour. To put it another way, if one “enlarges” the fluctuations over one day, one obtains fluctuations which could very well be those over a year. Note, however, this is not always true.

Let’s take for example the saw : if one selects a small portion of the blade of the saw (a tooth) and then enlarge it, one does not obtain a new saw at all but only a very big tooth! In other words, on theblade of a saw, there are not teeth on teeth on teeth, etc.

Even if in certain cases the scale invariance is only statistical (stock market fluctuations, coastlines, clouds), it is nevertheless rigorously defined with what is called the fractal dimension, which measures in a way the degree of “roughness” of the fluctuations or of the boundaries of the object.

From : popmath.org.uk

Fern ‘tounges’

howstuffworks

threedeeprinting:

DisneyResearch Software Could Allow For 3D Printing of Toys at Home

"We developed an interactive design system that allows non-expert users to create animated mechanical characters. Given an articulated character as input, the user iteratively creates an animation by sketching motion curves indicating how different parts of the character should move. For each motion curve, our framework creates an optimized mechanism that reproduces it as closely as possible. The resulting mechanisms are attached to the character and then connected to each other using gear trains, which are created in a semi-automated fashion. The mechanical assemblies generated with our system can be driven with a single input driver, such as a hand-operated crank or an electric motor, and they can be fabricated using rapid prototyping devices.

We demonstrate the versatility of our approach by designing a wide range of mechanical characters, several of which we manufactured using 3D printing. While our pipeline is designed for characters driven by planar mechanisms, significant parts of it extend directly to non-planar mechanisms, allowing us to create characters with compelling 3D motions.”

Link to project page & press release:http://www.disneyresearch.com/project…

Computational Design of Mechanical Characters (by DisneyResearchHub)

3d printed disney products

howstuffworks

odditiesoflife:

Animated Gifs of Amazing Animals Facts

The people who research, write and produce QI (Quite Interesting), a British comedy television game show which tests obscure facts, posted an extremely popular AMA on Reddit. This was followed up by sharing a series of fascinating facts about animals as animated gifs. The animated gifs were created by artist Michael Whaite.

sources 1, 2

Weird but all true

howstuffworks
breakingnews:

Study: Earth suitable for life for at least another 1.75 billion years
Live Science: A new study conducted by scientists in the UK concludes that Earth should be suited for life for at least another 1.75 billion years.
A nuclear holocaust or a rogue asteroid are among the potential disasters that could prevent Earth being habitable for that long.If one of those scenarios doesn’t occur, between 1.75 billion and 3.25 billion years from now, Earth will travel out of the habitable zone of the solar system and move too close to the sun, causing Earth’s oceans to evaporate.
Photo: This composite image uses a number of swaths of the Earth’s surface taken in January 2012. (NASA/NOAA/GSFC/Suomi NPP/VIIRS/Norman Kuring)


EARTH—🌍🌎🌏 Around for another 1.75 billion years

breakingnews:

Study: Earth suitable for life for at least another 1.75 billion years

Live Science: A new study conducted by scientists in the UK concludes that Earth should be suited for life for at least another 1.75 billion years.

A nuclear holocaust or a rogue asteroid are among the potential disasters that could prevent Earth being habitable for that long.

If one of those scenarios doesn’t occur, between 1.75 billion and 3.25 billion years from now, Earth will travel out of the habitable zone of the solar system and move too close to the sun, causing Earth’s oceans to evaporate.

Photo: This composite image uses a number of swaths of the Earth’s surface taken in January 2012. (NASA/NOAA/GSFC/Suomi NPP/VIIRS/Norman Kuring)

EARTH—🌍🌎🌏
Around for another 1.75 billion years

howstuffworks
techstuffhsw:

thisistheverge:

The world’s first 3D-printed gun now owned by the world’s largest design museum
The first-ever 3D-printed gun is now on show at London’s Victoria and Albert (V&A) museum. Dubbed “The Liberator” by its creator Cody Wilson, several examples of the gun were purchased by the art and design museum recently, and went on show September 14th, the first day of the London Design Festival. The V&A says it’s “acquired two Liberator prototypes, one disassembled gun, and a number of archive items” to “enhance its collection of 3D printed objects and represent a turning point in debates around digital manufacturing.” According to a Forbes interview with Wilson, both of the prototypes were fired, and one had its right side blown off in a failed test. 

Further listening: Our episode on Cody Wilson and The Liberator, Printing a Gun [mp3].
This weapon isn’t the first to bear the name “The Liberator”. The first was a disposable, one-shot pistol designed by the Allies during WWII to be air-dropped into occupied France. As far as we could tell during our research, a million were produced in less than 6 months, but none were ever distributed due to the guns’ dangerously inconsistent functionality. They were more of a scare tactic than an actual defense plan. Which makes the modern-day version an apt successor to the name as of yet.


First 3d printed gun

techstuffhsw:

thisistheverge:

The world’s first 3D-printed gun now owned by the world’s largest design museum

The first-ever 3D-printed gun is now on show at London’s Victoria and Albert (V&A) museum. Dubbed “The Liberator” by its creator Cody Wilson, several examples of the gun were purchased by the art and design museum recently, and went on show September 14th, the first day of the London Design Festival. The V&A says it’s “acquired two Liberator prototypes, one disassembled gun, and a number of archive items” to “enhance its collection of 3D printed objects and represent a turning point in debates around digital manufacturing.” According to a Forbes interview with Wilson, both of the prototypes were fired, and one had its right side blown off in a failed test. 

Further listening: Our episode on Cody Wilson and The Liberator, Printing a Gun [mp3].

This weapon isn’t the first to bear the name “The Liberator”. The first was a disposable, one-shot pistol designed by the Allies during WWII to be air-dropped into occupied France. As far as we could tell during our research, a million were produced in less than 6 months, but none were ever distributed due to the guns’ dangerously inconsistent functionality. They were more of a scare tactic than an actual defense plan. Which makes the modern-day version an apt successor to the name as of yet.

First 3d printed gun